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David Kitts and Margaret Ann McCormick




Husband David Kitts 2,3,4




           Born: 16 Apr 1841 - , , Washington, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Jun 1923 - , Union Twp, Lawrence, OH
         Buried: Jun 1923 - Brammer/McCormick Cemetery, , Lawrence, OH


         Father: George Kitts\Goetz (1802-1875) 2,3,5
         Mother: Louisa (Lovey) Ayles (1803-1851) 2,4,5


       Marriage: 7 Aug 1865 - At Bride's Home, Proctorville, Lawrence, OH

Noted events in his life were:
Alt Birth, 16 Apr 1841 - , , Noble, OH




Wife Margaret Ann McCormick 2

            AKA: Kitts
           Born: 4 Mar 1842 - , , Noble, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 Oct 1930 - , Union Twp, Lawrence, OH
         Buried: Oct 1930 - Brammer/McCormick Cemetery, , Lawrence, OH


         Father: John Wesley McCormick (1811-1875)
         Mother: Jane Mendenhall (1813-1881)





Children
1 F Mary Jane Kitts 3,4,18

           Born: 9 Jul 1866 - , Windsor Twp, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 10 Sep 1869 - , Windsor Twp, Lawrence, OH
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Never Married


2 F Lillie May Kitts 3,4

           Born: 21 Sep 1867 - , Windsor Twp, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 1935 26
         Buried: 
         Spouse: George W. Lauderman (1862-1935) 18
           Marr: 11 May 1884 - At Bride's Home, , Lawrence, OH 18



3 F Florence Adelia Kitts 3,4

            AKA: Della Florence
           Born: 14 Dec 1867 - , Windsor Twp, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1889
         Buried: 



4 F Adelia F. Kitts 2,3,4

           Born: 14 Dec 1869 - , Windsor Twp, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Wille C. Wakefield (Est 1865-      ) 18
           Marr: 7 Mar 1889 - , , Lawrence, OH 18



5 M Charles Wesley Kitts 3,4

           Born: 10 Jan 1872 - , Windsor Twp, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 9 Nov 1957
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Belle Smith (Est 1870-      )
           Marr: 19 Dec 1894 - , , Lawrence, OH 18



6 F Anna\Amy Kitts 2,3,4,18

            AKA: Amy
           Born: 10 Oct 1873 - , Windsor Twp, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 6 Apr 1877 - , Windsor Twp, Lawrence, OH
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Never Married


7 F Harriet Kitts 3,4

           Born: 12 Jan 1876 - , Greasy Ridge, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1957
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Dr. H. F. Massie (Est 1870-      ) 18
           Marr: 3 Feb 1897 - , , Lawrence, OH 18



8 M William H. Kitts 2,3,4

           Born: 12 Nov 1878 - , Windsor Twp, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Fritz Smith (Est 1880-      )
           Marr: 8 Jun 1904 18



9 M Oliver O. Kitts 3,4

           Born: 10 May 1880 - , Windsor Twp, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 1956
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sarah J. Brammer (1883-      )
           Marr: 5 Apr 1905 18



10 F Ona Gertrude Kitts (Twin) 2,3,4




            AKA: Potter
           Born: 30 Dec 1882 - , Proctorville, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 Oct 1964 - , Fort Worth, Tarrant, TX
         Buried:  - Laurel Land Memorial Park, Fort Worth, Tarrant, TX
         Spouse: James Mitchell Potter (1876-1961)
           Marr: 25 Feb 1903 - , Proctorville, Lawrence, OH



11 F Ida May Kitts (Twin) 2,3,4,18




           Born: 30 Dec 1882 - , Union Twp, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 26 Oct 1918 - , Longmont, Boulder, CO
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Lewis Evan Corn (Est 1880-      )
           Marr: 17 Jan 1906 18



12 M Jesse Edgar Kitts 2,3,4

           Born: 16 Jul 1886 - , Proctorville, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Aug 1922 - , Greeley, Jefferson, CO 18
 Cause of Death: Killed by lightning while climbing mountain
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Mollie E. Corn (Est 1885-      )
           Marr: 16 Aug 1905 18



13 F Grace Myrtle Kitts 2,3,4,18

           Born: 8 Nov 1889 - , Union Twp, Lawrence, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 Feb 1910
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Justus Miller (Est 1880-      )
           Marr: 25 Dec 1908 18




General Notes (Husband)

!FAMILY BIO:KITTS FAMILY; 1802-1981; Family Group Sheets from Carl Murdock-2045 West Sixth Ave,Lancaster,Ohio 43130; ; A few pages in possession of Drusilla Falk;;.
!MARRIAGE: Ohio Marriages; ; Lawrence Co.,Ohio; ; FHL film at Fort Worth Family History Center; NOTES: IGI record too;.
!CENSUS: 1900 U.S. Census; Lawrence Co.,Ohio; 1900; ; Federal Archives,Fort
!CENSUS:1910 Federal Census Lawrence Co.,
!CENSUS:1920 Federal Census Lawrence Co.,Ohio
!Death record from an internet site on Lawrence Co.,Ohio


General Notes (Wife)

!FAMILY BIO:KITTS FAMILY; 1802-1981; Family Group Sheets from Carl Murdock-2045
!CENSUS: 1900 U.S. Census; Lawrence Co.,Ohio; 1900; ; Federal Archives,Fort
!CENSUS:1910 Federal Census Lawrence Co.,Ohio.
!CENSUS:1920 Federal Census Lawrence Co.,Ohio


Notes (Marriage)

Spouse:David KITTS Date:10 Aug 1865 Location:Lawrence Co., Ohio

Witness: E. Bramer, Stephen Smith
By Rev. Penman.


General Notes for Child Adelia F. Kitts

!BIRTH: Ohio Births; 1866-1910; Lawrence Co.,Ohio births; ; FHL microfilm; ;.
!FAMILY BIO:KITTS FAMILY; 1802-1981; Family Group Sheets from Carl Murdock-2045


General Notes for Child Anna\Amy Kitts

!BIRTH: Ohio Births; 1866-1910; Lawrence Co.,Ohio births; ; FHL microfilm; ;.
!FAMILY BIO:KITTS FAMILY; 1802-1981; Family Group Sheets from Carl Murdock-2045


General Notes for Child Harriet Kitts

KITHAR90.TXT This was written by Hattie Kitts Massie and given to Ona Kitts Potter in 1957. Copied verbatim except for obvious spelling errors.


SOME THOUGHTS ABOUT MY 80 - PLUS YEARS OF LIFE
by Hattie Kitts Massie
August 11, 1957
I was born January 12, 1876, on Greasy Ridge, Lawrence County, Ohio, to David and Margaret Ann McCormick Kitts and named Harriet (after my Mother's sister) Kitts. It is a marvelous and wonderful thing to live in this beautiful world and to be bless with lovely Christian parents and brothers and sisters. So many joys and pleasures and pleasures - more than I could ever tell.
When I was about four or five years old, father sold our farm; and we moved to my grandmother's (Jane Mendenhall McCormick) farm in Union Township four miles back of Proctorville. She was in poor health and a widow and needed my Mother to take care of her. She died in 1881 and Father bought the interest in the farm of the other McCormick heirs and it became our own, wonderful farm home - the home where my Mother was raised and where we children grew to manhood and womanhood.
We all loved its hills - some in woods and some in orchards, its level land for wheat and corn, its pasture land for our horses, cows, sheep, hogs, chickens, turkeys, geese, and so on. Ten children grew up on this farm to maturity. My oldest sister, Mary Jane, died in 18(7)5 (1865) before I was born, and Amy (?) died when I was 13 months old; so I only know about them through others. The trees in the woods meant a lot, for we burned wood in the fire place and cook stove for many years; then we got to buying some coal and used both wood and coal. My grandfather, John Wesley McCormick, was a farmer and a United Brethren preacher.
My mother was a wonderful church worker, and no minister could utter more beautiful prayers than my Mother. They touched the heart and made you feel like you must love the Lord and live a good life. She and Father trained us to go to Sunday School and Church regularly. Only every third Sunday would we have a preacher, and our house was always open to the then-called "Circuit Riders"' as the preacher would serve six or seven churches throughout the country and would ride horseback over the muddy roads wearing rubber leggings that covered their pants and keep them clean and dry and had saddle bags to carry their Bible, hymnbook, and clothing.
The Sundays when the minister was not with us we had Sunday School and class meetings. This was where the church members would sing, pray, and give their testimony on Christian experience; and it was wonderful. I recall to mind many of the things they said while I remember very little about the sermons. Later on we had preaching most every Sunday.
When we had quarterly meetings both the preacher and presiding Elder (now called District Superintendent) also visiting delegates from all the churches on the circuit would fill our house. We had plenty of food and Mother was a good cook; and we made many new Christian friends - all worked together to ge the work done and would get back to church and not miss a service.
We were not far from the church but had to walk one-half mile to school and carry a basket of lunch for the kitts tribe. It was a one room school house with one teacher and fifty or more pupils. We had good school teachers for those times and our "Literary Society" where we gave recitations, debates, readings, dialogues, etc. (yes, and "Spelling Bees") were helpful in our education and social life.
Wilbur Sydenstricker was my favorite teacher, later becoming a minister and Sydenstricker Memorial Church in Ironton was dedicated to his memory as he died of typhoid fever while he was pastor of that church. He was a grand man and beloved by all. He was sister Della's sweetheart, but she chose to marry Will Wakefield from Clifton City, Mo., and Sydenstricker never married. Another fine teacher was B. F. Forgey, who has been editor of the "Ashland(?) Daily Independent" for years.
With church and school work and farm activities we went merrily on from year to year. Each one of us ten children were kept busy for on a farm there were plenty of tasks for all. Mother arose at 5:00 summer and winter. With so many to cook for, and fix lunch and get all off to school, it took time; and we were seldom late for school. It was necessary to get an early start in summer time-to take care of the crops, cows, chickens, turkeys, garden, flowers, etc. Often times there were extra farm helpers to cook for, and we always had one farm hand who lived with us. John Bame lived with us so many years that all his life he seemed like a brother.
We raised and canned all our fruits and vegetables - had our cured meat to last from one hog-killing time until the next year. We had our wild black and raspberries to pick and tried to have 50 gallons in jars, besides the jelly and jam. Then our good orchards, with peaches and many varieties of apples, plums, grapes, gooseberries, etc. gave us an abundance of good eats. We made apple butter in a 20-gallon brass kettle, stirring it with a long handled wooden stirrer out-of-doors with a wood fire under the kettle - cooking it for hours and stirring all the time to prevent it from burning. We made fifty gallons or so and sealed it in stone jars - some one, two, and five gallons. My! How we did eat it up with hot biscuits. If we did not rase some cane, we would buy sorghum by the gallon from a neighbor, Clint Roberts, who had a cane mill and made molasses every year - and was it good with hot biscuits and sausage! Then we had nice, wooden barrels to fill with pickles and sauerkraut. We also had bees to make honey - doesn't it all sound good? And it was - I can tell you.
Laundry work? Lots of it - done in wooden or zinc tubs on a washboard and usually soap that Mother had made. She saved fats and made lye by saving wood ashes until a barrel was filled, then let water seep through the ashes. If she did not have enough lye, she would buy Babbotts Potash and boil together until the lye had dissolved all the fat. Overnight it was allowed to set and the next day was cut out into squares or cakes. What did not harden enough to be cut out was put in a jar and called soft soap; and believe me! it would clean the clothes, but was it hard on the hands.
Part of the time we kept sheep, and the wool was hand picked to get out the briars and anything that clung to the wool as the sheep roamed in the fields. Then Father would take it to Guyandotte, West Virginia, to have it carded; then Mother would spin it into yarn and knit all our stockings, socks, gloves, wristlets, and hoods, scarves, etc.
Besides the spinning wheel, she had a loom and wove rag rugs, carpets, and wool blankets - also did the family sewing. She was very busy, but she found time to visit and nurse the sick and sometimes sat up all night with a sick neighbor. She was often called to maternity cases as the neighbors mostly helped each other. There were no trained nurses then, but some way they made it.
Neither were there any bath tubs, but in the summer time the men could bathe in a stream that ran along part of the farm; and we used a tub or wash pan in the winter. We at last had a large, six-hole coal range with a reservoir attached that held several gallons of water and by having kettles or iron pots full on the stove we managed to have enough hot water for our Saturday night baths. But it was sure a "splash night" with so many of us to bathe.
Father and Mother were good workers and managers and were patient and loving with their large family, but we knew we had to obey or be punished. As I think back over the years, I wonder how they managed us so well. Mother went about her work singing - usually church hymns. One of her favorites was "What a Friend We Have in Jesus" and "Oh! For a Thousand Tongues To Sing My Great Redeemer's Praise". She did a lot of praying and taught us to pray and love the Lord saying "He loves you and watches over you and sees your every act and deed."
Father raised, bought, and packed tobacco in great wooden hogshead - all who could, worked in the tobacco barn. Some would sort the cured tobacco - one would be in the hogshead to place it after someone had carried it to them, then when so much had been placed they would let a heavy press down to pack it firm and solid. When the barrels were filled to their capacity, they were hauled to Proctorville, put on a boat, and shipped to Cincinnati markets. I well remember how happy we were to have Daddy bring us some gift. I think the nicest one was an "organette" that we placed musical rolls (like they have on a player piano) on and turned a crank and got the most charming music. How I wish I had it in good shape today. It was the only one I ever saw.
I took music lessons when I was fourteen from Rose Kitts, my dear Uncle Ed Kitt's daughter. She stayed at our house for a month, and I learned some chords, also some hymns; and my family was happy. All would gather around the organ and Will blew on a french-harp jews-harp. So it was all a little entertaining. I took music lessons for two summers from Miss Cox, who attended music school in Cincinnati and from Miss Saunders of Proctorville.
All of us (except Ona) united with the United Brethren Church near-by. I was converted at fourteen years of age; and I believe everyone should join some church in their youthful days. What do you think of this. Wes, Della, and I joined the church the same year, and one lovely Sunday I knelt at the church altar (with six other classmates, all dressed in white) and was sprinkled with water by our preacher (Rev. A. A. Chapman, later he was pastor of the United Brethren Church in Ironton) then we all went to Guyan Creek where Wesley and several others were immersed in the water. After that Della knelt by the edge of the creed and Rev. Chapman slowly poured a pitcher of water over her head. The three modes of baptism were all used on us three the same day. The important thing is spiritual baptism.
Sister Ona married James M. Potter from Beaman, Mo., and she was converted in the Baptist Church where he was a member; and she has been a great church worker through the years.
We were a healthy family and did not have too many doctor bills. Dr. Gerard Ricketts of Proctorville was our family doctor. He had three sons and all became doctors. One is living in Cincinnati, and a nephew, Dr. J. F. Ricketts, is located here in Huntington.
I suppose we had our spats like all children, but we were not a quarrelsome family, but a Christian family trying to live right in the sight of God and man.
I was 7 years old when my twin sisters arrived. They were named Ida and Ona and were identical twins - hard to tell one from the other, and we almost worshipped them. They were so beautiful. The only set of twins in all that section and many people came to see them. Sister Lilly, being the oldest and thereby having the most responsibility said "Twins are too much, I think, and one baby at a time is enough to take care of." But Della could help out a lot and we had a woman with us for a while, and all went well.
As most families do, we played games - dominoes, Authors, and Father loved to play checkers. As we grew up, we played croquet and had such a nice yard for the game, but Mother never wanted us to play on Sunday. To her, the Sabbath Day was ordained by God for a rest and worship day, and only necessary work should be done.
Sometimes we had a watermelon patch, but Mother did not like for us to take our company there on Sunday, but we would serve and eat our melon on the porch or in the yard. No doubt her strict rules kept us from getting into any disgrace, for we all grew up and had nothing harmful said about us.
The boys could date any of the girls they desired to keep company with, for they were nice boys. We had good horses and buggy and Father bought a lovely carriage, drawn by two horses for family use; and on Memorial Day and on the Fourth of July we would take a large basket of food and attend the celebration in Rome and Proctorville. Father was a soldier in the Civil War, 36th Ohio Infantry Volunteers. When in the war for over three years, he was a member of the G. A. R. (Grand Army of the Republic.) My Father was wounded in the battle of Antittam September 17, 1862; and history says that it was the bloodiest day America ever saw. He fought in Lewisburg, West Virginia, Bull Run, South Mountain, Chickamonga, Martinsburg, Lynchburg, Hoover's Gap, Cedar Creek, and others. ...We would put a flag and flowers on the soldiers' graves. Usually the G.A.R. men would march in a group, dressed in their uniforms, and place the flags on the graves; and their daughters, dressed in white, would carry baskets of flowers and scatter flowers on the graves. The band with fife and drums would play "Dixie", "Marching Along Through Georgia", "Star-Spangled Banner" and other songs - it was quite thrilling! Also the sons of these soldiers formed a band called the S. of V. Band (Sons of Veterans) and Wesley played a fife or flute.


General Notes for Child William H. Kitts

!BIRTH: Ohio Births; 1866-1910; Lawrence Co.,Ohio births; ; FHL microfilm; ;.
!CENSUS: 1900 U.S. Census; Lawrence Co.,Ohio; 1900; ; Federal Archives,Fort


General Notes for Child Ona Gertrude Kitts (Twin)

Ida and Ona were twins.

Kitts Database
!BIRTH: Ohio Births; 1866-1910; Lawrence Co.,Ohio births; ; FHL microfilm; ;.
!CENSUS: 1900 U.S. Census; Lawrence Co.,Ohio; 1900; ; Federal Archives,Fort


General Notes for Child Ida May Kitts (Twin)

!BIRTH: Ohio Births; 1866-1910; Lawrence Co.,Ohio births; ; FHL microfilm; ;.
!CENSUS: 1900 U.S. Census; Lawrence Co.,Ohio; 1900; ; Federal Archives,Fort


General Notes for Child Jesse Edgar Kitts

!BIRTH: Ohio Births; 1866-1910; Lawrence Co.,Ohio births; ; FHL microfilm; ;.
!CENSUS: 1900 U.S. Census; Lawrence Co.,Ohio; 1900; ; Federal Archives,Fort
Alt Birth: 18 Jul 1886 Union Twp, Lawrence Co, OH


General Notes for Child Grace Myrtle Kitts

!BIRTH: Ohio Births; 1866-1910; Lawrence Co.,Ohio births; ; FHL microfilm; ;.
!CENSUS: 1900 U.S. Census; Lawrence Co.,Ohio; 1900; ; Federal Archives,Fort
picture

David L. Kitts and Susan Taylor




Husband David L. Kitts 2,3,4

           Born: 1864 - , Elk Twp, Noble, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: William Kitts (1836-1902) 2,3,4
         Mother: Charlotte Jane Scott (1837-1902) 2


       Marriage: 8 Nov 1888 - , , Braxton, WV




Wife Susan Taylor 2

           Born: 15 Oct 1866 - , , , Virginia
     Christened: 
           Died: 11 Jun 1936 - , Gassaway, Braxton, West Virginia
 Cause of Death: Hit by automobile, accident
         Buried: 13 Jun 1936 - Taylor Cemetery, , Braxton, West Virginia

Noted events in her life were:
Death Record 8, 11 Jun 1936 - , , Braxton, WV

Name: Susan Kitts Sex: Death Date: 11 Jun 1936 Death Place: Braxton, West Virginia Age at Death: Burial Place: Burial Date: Cemetery: Funeral Home: Birth Date: Birth Place: Marital Status: Spouse: David Kitts Occupation: Address: Residence: Mother: Lawrence Mother's Birth Place: Father: John S. Taylor Father's Birth Place: Informant:



Children
1 M Hugh Cottsford Kitts 2,3,4

           Born: 20 Feb 1899 - , , Braxton, WV
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




General Notes (Wife)

!Info from Larry Kitts--Gedcom file
!Marriage--2nd George Gumm
picture

Deanah Kitts




Husband

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Deanah Kitts 2,3,4

           Born: 1846 - , , Noble, OH
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Phillip Kitts (Abt 1811-After 1880) 2,3,4
         Mother: Deborah (1821-1880) 2




General Notes (Wife)

!IGI-MARRIAGE-Batch #M413222
picture

Edna Kitts




Husband

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Edna Kitts 2,3,4

           Born: Abt 1905 - , , , Ohio
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Grant Kitts (1864-      ) 2,3,4
         Mother: Olive (Olla) Traylor (1869-      ) 2




General Notes (Wife)

!CENSUS:1910 Federal Census Greenup Co.,Kentucky